What is managed endpoint security?


Endpoint security is the practice of protecting the endpoints or entry points of end-user devices such as desktops, laptops and mobile devices from being exploited by malicious campaigns and actors. Endpoint security systems protect these endpoints on a network or in the cloud from cyberse

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What is managed endpoint security?

Endpoint security is the practice of protecting the endpoints or entry points of end-user devices such as desktops, laptops and mobile devices from being exploited by malicious campaigns and actors. Endpoint security systems protect these endpoints on a network or in the cloud from cybersecurity threats. Endpoint security has evolved from traditional antivirus software to provide comprehensive protection from sophisticated malware and evolving managed endpoint security

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Organizations of all sizes are at risk from nation states, cyber activists, organized crime, and malicious and accidental insider threats. Endpoint security is often seen as the first line of cybersecurity and is one of the first places organizations seek to secure their corporate networks.

 

As the volume and complexity of cybersecurity threats have steadily increased, so has the need for more advanced endpoint security solutions. Today's endpoint protection systems are designed to rapidly detect, analyze, block and contain ongoing attacks. To do this, they must work together with other security technologies to give administrators visibility into advanced threats to accelerate detection and remediation response times.

Why endpoint security matters

An endpoint protection platform is an essential part of corporate cybersecurity for a variety of reasons. First, in today's business world, data is often a company's most valuable asset - and if they lost that data, or got access to that data, it could put the entire company at risk of bankruptcy. Businesses also have to contend not only with an increasing number of endpoints, but also with an increase in the number of endpoint types. These factors in themselves make enterprise termination security more difficult, but are exacerbated by remote operations and BYOD policies, which make border security increasingly unstable and create vulnerabilities. injuries. The threat landscape is also becoming increasingly complex - hackers are constantly devising new ways to gain access, steal information, or manipulate employees to provide sensitive information. Including the opportunity cost of redistributing assets from business objectives to threat management, the cost of a major failure, and the true financial cost of compliance breaches, it's easy to see why termination protection platforms are seen as needs. in terms of consolidating innovation.

 

How resolution protection works

Endpoint security is their use to protect data and workflows associated with individual devices that connect to your network. Endpoint Protection Platforms (EPPs) work by scanning files as they enter the network. Modern EPPs use the power of the cloud to create a growing database of threat information, freeing endpoints from the flowering associated with storing this information locally and maintaining it. needed to maintain these databases. Accessing this data in the cloud allows for greater speed and scalability.

The EPP provides system administrators with a centralized console, which is installed on a gateway or network server and allows cybersecurity professionals to control the security of each device remotely. The client software is then assigned to each endpoint: it can be delivered as SaaS and can be managed remotely or it can be installed directly on the device. Once the endpoint is configured, the client software can send updates to the endpoints as needed, authenticate login attempts from each device, and manage corporate policies from one place. EPPs protect endpoints through application control, which blocks the use of unsafe or unauthorized applications, and through encryption, which helps prevent data loss.

 

When EPP is configured, it can quickly detect malware and other threats. Some solutions also include an endpoint detection and response (EDR) component. EDR capabilities enable the detection of more advanced threats such as polymorphic attacks, fileless malware, and zero-day attacks. By employing continuous monitoring, the EDR solution can offer better visibility and a variety of response options.

 

EPP solutions are available in local or cloud-based models. While cloud-based products are more scalable and can be more easily integrated with today's architecture, some regulatory / compliance rules may require on-premises security.

What is considered an end point?

 

If a device is connected to a network, it is considered an end point. With the growing popularity of BYOD (bring your own device) and IoT (Internet of Things), the number of individual devices connected to an organization's network can quickly reach tens (and hundreds) of thousands.

 

Because they are entry points for threats and malware, endpoints (especially mobile and remote devices) are the preferred target of adversaries. Mobile terminal devices have become more than just Android and iPhone devices - think of the latest wearable watches, smart devices, voice-activated digital assistants and other IoT-enabled smart devices. We now have networked sensors in our cars, planes, hospitals, and even on oil rig drilling. As the different types of endpoints have evolved and expanded, the security solutions that protect them have also had to adapt.

 

The latest SANS Endpoint Security Survey highlights the importance of implementing a complete endpoint security solution. Some of the key findings from this survey include:

 

28% of those surveyed reported that their terminals had been breached.

A variety of threat vectors were used, including web attacks (52%), social engineering / phishing (58%), and / or credential theft / compromise (49%).

Only 39% of the attacks were detected by traditional antivirus.

Another 39% of the violations were detected by SIEM alerts.

 

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